Hugo

Hugo

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Hugo

Ben Kingsley, Sacha Baron Cohen, Asa Butterfield, Chloe Grace Moretz , Ray Winstone

Throughout his extraordinary career, Academy Award-wining director Martin Scorsese has brought his unique vision and dazzling gifts to life in a series of unforgettable films. This holiday season the ... read more read more...legendary storyteller invites you to join him on a thrilling journey to a magical world with his first-ever 3-D film, based on Brian Selznick's award-winning, imaginative New York Times best-seller, "The Invention of Hugo Cabret." Hugo is the astonishing adventure of a wily and resourceful boy whose quest to unlock a secret left to him by his father will transform Hugo and all those around him, and reveal a safe and loving place he can call home. -- (C) Paramount

Id: 11150425

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Recent Reviews


  • May 27, 2014
    There's a whole lot to love about "Hugo" but most of the time the beauty it strives to connect with a deep emotion, fails to do so. The main reason "Hugo" works is because its visuals are enchanting, it's based in the world of Melies, and it connects different elements of movie m... read moreagic together to form a great story about magic in technology and film. Though the film is very beautiful and has colorful characters, including Ben Kingsley as Melies and Sacha Baron Cohen as a squeaky legged patrolman, there's no emotional response to the absolute magic. The lead character is played by Asa Butterfield, who gives little to no emotion when delivering his lines, while his backstory, and how he gets himself involved in working the clocks in the train station, is full of holes. The film is strangely paced and the plot is oddly structured. Though it's definitely the pinnacle of ooh and aah filmmaking (based on the greatness of Melies) it lacks the chemistry of the thing it is inspired by.
  • April 14, 2014
    Yes, a tip of the hat to the origins of filmic storytelling, and yes, made by one of the acknowledged best in the field, but lacking the essential heart connection it reaches for, misses it but only so much ... and that's unfortunate. Nonetheless a good work, with competent profe... read moressionals all over the place, but when Sasha Baron Cohen steals your film, and as only a minor character, you should know you've got a communications mix up.
  • November 4, 2013
    three stars
  • fb791220692
    September 19, 2013
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    Slow and calculated as it is, as the film progresses, it begins to reveal layers of depth and wonder. Scorsese has created the best 3D film ever (because as good as Avatar looked, there was nothing special beyond the aesthetics), and all of the performers give strong, slightly se... read morelf-aware performances, and you can tell they all had fun performing. The sluggish pace and abrupt change of subject matter means that a lot of people (especially kids) will either be bored of the movie or simply won't enjoy the sudden history lesson pushed upon them, but I think anybody should give it a try anyways.
  • July 26, 2013
    A young orphan unlocks the secret to the life of a bitter old toy vendor when he tries to steal from his shop. Martin Scorsese tries his very best to ape Jean-Pierre Jeunet in this sickly-sweet homage to the life and work of cinema pioneer Georges Méliès which despite its creativ... read moree use of 3D and CGI effects and potentially interesting subject matter, just did not work for me. The story centres virtually exclusively around stereotypical urchin Asa Butterfield and his Enid Blyton-esque, jolly hockey-sticks playmate Chloe Moretz and as such the tone of the film is aimed squarely at children. In fact the saccharine soaked, manipulative and oh-so predictable script is very much like that of an animated feature, as is the weakest of the weak slapstick provided by Sacha Baron Cohen whose performance seems to be channelling Peter Sellers and Peter Cook by way of 'Allo 'Allo, and he is AWFUL. Ben Kingsley does provide some quality support however and the section recreating Méliès' work is by far the best part of the film, but it is far too short-lived for my liking. Hugo basically left me very cold and rather bored, although I suspect that this is purely because at its core, it's just not my cup of tea.
  • December 26, 2012
    Visually it's good, but even then (dare I say it) a little indulgent. The aggressively quaint story, acting, generically british accents and general schmaltz overwhelm the whole affair. I mean, yes, it is a 'love letter to the cinema' but in that case its sloppily, although earne... read morestly, written. The Artist is an equally reverent and sincere homage but so much more successful, and entertaining.
  • October 3, 2012
    Beautifull Movie.
  • August 27, 2012
    Well done. Enjoyable. Imaginative. Enchanting. Some say that this movie is slow..well it is. This is a movie you have to invest yourself into. This is a movie for movie lovers, not for those who simply have a passing interest and enjoy a flick every now and then. The story is bea... read moreutiful, and the cinematography was incredible. The two young leads were wonderful. Scorsese has great talent, and it shows here...
  • August 25, 2012
    Brian Selznick's award-winning novel becomes an award-winning film by award-winning director Martin Scorcese. Hugo is one of the best family movies in recent years and maybe one of the best family movies ever. It's beautifully crafted and full of eye candy. It's also a loyal adap... read moretation of a wonderful novel.

    The film follows Hugo Cabret, an orphaned boy who lives within the walls of a train station in Paris. Hugo possesses an automaton that his father found in a museum while he worked there. However, this automaton is full of secrets. Hugo befriends Isabella and the two set out to unravel its secrets and it will impact both of their lives.

    The plot to Hugo is pretty simple and it's executed very well. Martin Scorcese knows how to draw you into the story. The film starts with a cold opening. The tile isn't revealed until fifteen minutes in. There is beautiful cinematography and camera work. I love how the camera swept through the train station. The dialogue doesn't kick until a few minutes. We are also introduced to the visual look of the film and I loved it. It was like something out of a dream. For a family film, it's rather long. But the film paces well. It takes it's time, the characters are well developed, and the story keeps you interested. Scorcese's direction is higly impressive. I love his camera work in the film and the cinematography in this film is beautiful. He sure knows how to direct a film. He's also very good with actors. If you can't act, then I guess you can't be in a Scorcese flick. John Logan's screenplay is well written. There is a lot of good dialogue in this film. It's stays true to Brian Selznick's novel but there are some changes. They are some side characters that weren't featured in the novel and they make bigger characters out of the Station Inspector and the librarian. Aside from that, the film was true to the source material.

    Hugo has a lot of good performances. There is not one weak actor in the film. The title role is played by Asa Butterfield and he is one fine actor. For a young actor, he's very good. He totally got into his character and I could tell he was having a good time playing Hugo. I enjoy watching Chloe Moretz and I think she will have a long career. She is an impressive teen actress. And a cute one. Her performance as Isabella was very good but I did find her French accent to be a little cheesy. Other than that, the two young actors put on fine performances. I loved seeing them interact with the world around them. The world built in this film is a joy to watch. I hope the two go on to make more good movies. Ben Kingsley is great in his supporting role as Papa Georges. Kingsley always impresses and he did so in this film. I like how his character evolved over the film. I enjoyed Helen McCrory as Mama Jeanne and Jude Law did well in his small role. Sacha Baron Cohen is my favorite of the supporting cast. He plays the Station Inspector and he is very enjoyable and fun to watch. He's also very funny. Christopher Lee is awesome, right? He plays The Librarian. Lee has an awesome voice and is a great actor and he shines in his minor role. I liked the side characters they added like the lady who sells flowers, who's also the Station Inspector's love interest, the lady in the café as well as her love interest. I don't think they were in the book but they were nice touches.

    Hugo pays tribute to silent films and that is one of the great things about this film. The history of cinema plays a big part in the film and you learn a lot about it. You also get to see how people perceived cinema back then. Also, the score was great. Howard Shore's score perfectly fit the film's atmosphere. There is also a bit of French music in there that is really good.

    Hugo is a wonderful family film. The visual style is really cool, the writing and acting are impressive, and the story is great. This is a highly memorable film and I've watched it twice by now. I wish I could've seen it in 3D but it looks great on Blu-ray. Martin Scorcese has crafted a great family film that will entertain children, adults, and film buffs. It's also a great love letter to cinema. It made me thankful for the movies. What would the world be without them? If you love innocent family films, check out Hugo. You'll be glad you did. We need more movies like this.

    "Come and dream with me."
  • August 2, 2012
    It was fun and charming but lacked that intensity that scorsese films have. As a kid's movie, the film has shined through as a different kind in the genre.

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